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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 101-107

Feasibility of multisensory training and its effects on balance control in school going children with cerebral palsy


Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal Hospital, Manipal University, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
S Karthikbabu
Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal Hospital, Manipal University, Old Airport Road, Bengaluru - 560 017, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2395-4264.173448

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Context: Involvement of sensory system affects the motor performance of children with cerebral palsy, and the literature on sensory-based balance training is scarce in such children. Aim: To test the feasibility of administering multisensory training in school going children with cerebral palsy and its effects on balance control as measured by Balance Evaluation - Systems Test (BESTest). Settings and Design: School setting and a baseline-pre-post feasibility trial. Subjects and Methods: Seventeen children with cerebral palsy (gross motor function classification system level 1-3) aged between 6 and 16 years participated in sensory-based balance training encompassing inputs from visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive systems. Children with mental delay, hearing, and visual impairments and those who underwent treatments such as BOTOX, tendon lengthening, derotation surgery, or selective rhizotomy in the past 6 months were excluded. Following 2 months run-in period, each child underwent 45 min of training per session; a total of 18 sessions over 2 months duration. Statistical Analysis and Results: Repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc test was done to analyze within-subject changes and with respect to time. P < 0.05 was statistically significant. After training, all the components of BESTest showed statistically significant change (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Multisensory training is a feasible mode of practice in a school setting and is beneficial in improving balance control in children with cerebral palsy.


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