Indian Journal of Cerebral Palsy

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 90--93

Comorbidities and their relationship to subtype of cerebral palsy in a tertiary care hospital in South India


Raghavendraswami Amoghimath1, Vykuntaraju K Gowda1, Asha Benakappa2 
1 Department of Pediatric Neurology, Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Pediatrics, Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Vykuntaraju K Gowda
Department of Pediatric Neurology, Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India

Introduction: Comorbid conditions such as intellectual disability (ID), visual disability, epilepsy, and hearing impairment are associated with cerebral palsy (CP). For many children with cerebral palsy, it is these cooccurring conditions that may often have the greatest impact on the child and family from varying perspective. Aims: The aim of the current study was to provide data on the frequency and type of comorbidities in children with cerebral palsy and the burden of comorbidities among each motor subtypes of CP. In addition, we evaluated the causative agent of motor subtypes of CP. Methods: Two hundred consecutive children with cerebral palsy attending the pediatric neurology outpatient department with an age group from 3 months to 18 years were enrolled in the study. Information on neurologic subtype classified according to the topographic distribution of the motor impairment on neurologic examination and the presence of comorbidities: ID, visual impairment, hearing impairment, and coexisting afebrile seizures, was obtained. Demographic factors were also noted. Results: The mean age of the children was 55 months, with 120 boys and 80 girls. ID was seen in 91% (182/200) of children. Active afebrile seizure disorder was noted in 40% (80/200), severe auditory impairment was noted in 4% (8/200), and cortical visual impairment was noted in 19.5% (39/200) of children. Comorbidities were most frequent in children with spastic and dyskinetic cerebral palsy. The most common type of seizures was focal seizures in 47 individuals (23.5% of all the individuals), followed by generalized seizures in 23 individuals (11.5% of all the individuals) and myoclonic seizures in 11 individuals (5.5% of all the individuals). Conclusion: ID and seizures are more frequently associated comorbidities with CP. Bilateral spastic and dyskinetic CP are more likely to be associated with comorbidities.


How to cite this article:
Amoghimath R, Gowda VK, Benakappa A. Comorbidities and their relationship to subtype of cerebral palsy in a tertiary care hospital in South India.Indian J Cereb Palsy 2016;2:90-93


How to cite this URL:
Amoghimath R, Gowda VK, Benakappa A. Comorbidities and their relationship to subtype of cerebral palsy in a tertiary care hospital in South India. Indian J Cereb Palsy [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Jun 24 ];2:90-93
Available from: http://www.ijcpjournal.org/article.asp?issn=2395-4264;year=2016;volume=2;issue=2;spage=90;epage=93;aulast=Amoghimath;type=0